Pacific, West and Northeast are hit hardest by rising recycling costs and disappearing end markets

By Christina Weiler, Colgate University, Founder of UCan Nonprofit Organization China’s material import ban continues to wreak havoc the United States recycling industry. In previous posts, we explored the worsening effects on recycling infrastructure in individual US States, based on Waste Dive’s ongoing investigation. In this post, we analyze industry impacts by region. Based on Waste […]

Read More

Measuring Carbon Savings is the Answer! What was the Question?

By Adam Gendell, Associate Director Sustainable Packaging Coalition, GreenBlue & SWEEP Steering Committee Member If your state reported that their waste diversion practices resulted in prevention of 1,802,794 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents, would you be impressed? That’s a big number. What if you learned those savings equated to removing 379,535 cars from the […]

Read More

Waste Diversion needs Organics Diversion, and Organics Diversion Needs Compostable Packaging

by Adam Gendell, Associate Director Sustainable Packaging Coalition, GreenBlue & SWEEP Steering Committee Member There is no shortage of ambitious waste diversion goals, and several major cities are currently working towards 2020 milestones for high diversion or “zero waste” goals. Typical tactics for achieving these goals address construction & demolition waste, yard waste, and recyclable […]

Read More

Talkin’ Trash: What is the key to higher recycling rates?

As more cities set high diversion rate targets that can be challenging to achieve, some industry leaders view mixed waste processing as a clear solution. Other industry professionals remain opposed to the idea on principle and the lack of actual experience in the field. Find the article on WasteDive.com, and listen to the podcast here:

Read More

What We’ve Got Here, Is Failure to Separate (Part 1 of 3)

By Rob Watson, Chief Science Officer, EcoHub; Founder & Co-Chair SWEEP Steering Committee When materials are separate and relatively clean, they are called feedstocks. When they are mashed together after discarding, they are called garbage, even though the basic molecules composing the discarded materials are little changed from the original feedstock. Separation (plus a little […]

Read More